Mar 30, 2020  
2017-2018 Academic Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course Numbering Information

0001–0999 Developmental not-for-credit courses for students who need further preparation before enrolling in college-level courses. These courses award Equivalent Hours (EHs) that contribute to a student’s academic load, but do not count toward degree or certificate requirements.
1000–1999 College-level courses at the 1000 level provide students with foundational concepts or skills required in specific or multiple disciplines. These courses may be stand-alone or part of a sequence.
2000–2999 Courses at the 2000 level build upon the skills and concepts presented in the 1000-level courses. Students are expected to acquire foundational concepts prior to entry into courses at the 2000 level and are expected to be able to move forward to more complex subject mastery.

Prerequisites

Many courses require prior satisfactory completion of another course to equip students with the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in the course. For example, EGL-1020  Composition II: Writing About Literature cannot be taken unless EGL-1010  (the prerequisite) has been satisfactorily completed. In addition, for a number of introductory-level credit courses, a minimum level of proficiency in reading, writing, and mathematics, as determined by the college’s placement tests, is required as a prerequisite. In such cases, satisfactory completion of the appropriate developmental studies course (see ESL, DVE, DVM, and DVR listings) will satisfy the prerequisite as well. Students should be certain to check for prerequisites in the course listings that follow. Except when specifically authorized by the department chairperson or dean, registration will not be permitted if prerequisites have not been fully satisfied.

Course Contact Hours

At the end of some course descriptions is a phrase such as “3 studio hours” or “3 class/2 lab hours.” This indicates the actual time a student should expect to spend per week in a course, broken down by the type of contact—classroom/lecture, laboratory, studio, or clinical. If there is no such indicator for a course, students may assume there will be one class hour per week for each credit awarded for completion of the course. (Courses which meet in an accelerated or nontraditional format rather than in the usual full-semester, 15-week format will meet more than the hours indicated per week in order to reach the same number of total contact hours for the semester.)

General Education Requirements Key

  CL = Computer Literacy Req.
  E = English Req.
  H = Humanities Req.
  M = Math Req.
  Sc = Science Req.
  SS = Social Science Req.
 

Construction Management

Information and Engineering Technology Department
Center for Advanced Technology, Room 129 | 301-546-0752

  
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    CSM-2470 Construction Planning and Scheduling


    3 Credits
    Comprehensive overview and analysis of the requirements and use of planning and scheduling as an effective management tool. Includes the use of Microsoft Project with special emphasis on the planning process.
    Prerequisite(s): INT-1010  or 1330.
    (Formerly offered as CSM-1470 . Students may not receive credit for both CSM-1470  and CSM-2470.)
    (May also be taken as a noncredit course, CST-354 Construction Planning and Scheduling.)
  
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    CSM-2480 Construction Estimating


    3 Credits
    Introduction to construction estimating, including its purpose, methods of preparing estimates, types of estimates and handling of construction trades.
    Prerequisite(s): CSM-1450  or CSM-1830 .
    (Formerly CSM-1480 . Students may not receive credit for both CSM-1480  and CSM-2480.)
    (May also be taken as a noncredit course, CST-383 Construction Estimating I.)
  
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    CSM-2500 Construction Surveying


    3 Credits
    A course designed for construction personnel who must implement and lay out a site development plan. Lectures and hands-on field work help the student develop an understanding and use of the builder transit/level in all phases of construction.
    (Formerly CSM-1500 . Students may not receive credit for both CSM-1500  and CSM-2500.)
    Recommended: MAT-1120 , completed or concurrent.
  
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    CSM-2610 Building Mechanical and Electrical Systems


    3 Credits
    Overview of the systems in a commercial building-plumbing, HVAC, sprinkler, elevator, electrical (power, fire alarm, communications, and security), and their controls. Emphasis is on understanding system function and interconnection, rather than design.
    (May also be taken as a noncredit course, CST-415, Mechanical and Electrical Systems in Construction)
  
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    CSM-2850 Leadership in Construction


    3 Credits
    Principles of effective leadership as they apply to the construction industry, both in the field and in the office. Directed to all levels of responsibility from field foreman to upper management.
  
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    CSM-2900 Construction Enterprise Project


    3 Credits
    Working in teams, students will use the knowledge gained in previous courses to manage a multi-million-dollar construction project from start to finish. The teams will be presented with an initial design and create bids and schedules to run the job. Supervising faculty will present the teams with problems, disputes, and conflicts that must be dealt with to successfully complete a quality product on time and within budget. The teams also will produce written reports and oral presentations during the project.
    Prerequisite(s): CSM-1450 , CSM-1460 , CSM-2470 , CSM-2480 , and CSM-1830 .
    Capstone Course(s): In addition to all prerequisites, students must complete a minimum of 46 credits of courses relevant to the major prior to enrolling in this course. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher is also required.
  
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    CSM-2910 Cooperative Education


    1-3 Credits
    A maximum of six credits of cooperative education and internship experiences may be applied to any degree. These credits may not transfer to all four-year institutions. Contact the Career Services Office, Bladen Hall, Room 124, 301-546-0136, for more complete information.
  
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    CSM-2920 Cooperative Education


    1-3 Credits
    A maximum of six credits of cooperative education and internship experiences may be applied to any degree. These credits may not transfer to all four-year institutions. Contact the Career Services Office, Bladen Hall, Room 124, 301-546-0136, for more complete information.
  
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    CSM-2930 Cooperative Education


    1-3 Credits
    A maximum of six credits of cooperative education and internship experiences may be applied to any degree. These credits may not transfer to all four-year institutions. Contact the Career Services Office, Bladen Hall, Room 124, 301-546-0136, for more complete information.

Correctional Services

Public Safety and Law Department
Bladen Hall, Room 208 | 301-546-0553

  
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    COR-1510 Introduction to Corrections


    3 Credits
    A survey of the corrections field, including courts, detention, sentencing, adult institutions, probation, parole, and staffing and personnel issues. The history and philosophy of corrections will be examined with the purpose of building a framework for understanding current sentencing and correctional practices.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency.
  
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    COR-1530 Corrections Management


    3 Credits
    Course has been re-numbered. See COR-2570 .
  
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    COR-2510 Probation, Parole, and Community-Based Corrections


    3 Credits
    A study of the philosophy and functioning of community-based corrections organizations, specifically probation and parole. Emphasis is placed on the historical development of community-based practices, analysis of potential alternatives to current parole and probation procedures, including restorative justice measures and discussion of important issues and problems currently facing community-based corrections.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency.
  
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    COR-2570 Corrections Management


    3 Credits
    A study of the concepts, planning considerations, management theory and operational implications for staffing, security, safety, and treatment in the effective management of prisons, jails and detention facilities.
    Prerequisite(s): COR-1510  or departmental permission.
    (Formerly COR-1530 . Students may not receive credit for both COR-1530  and COR-2570.)

Criminal Justice

Public Safety and Law Department
Bladen Hall, Room 208 | 301-546-0553

  
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    CJT-1510 Introduction to Criminal Justice


    3 Credits
    A survey of the history, philosophy, and social development of police, courts, and corrections in a democratic society. Identification and operations of local, state, and federal agencies will be covered with criminal justice career orientation.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency.
  
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    CJT-1520 Police Operations


    3 Credits
    An exploration of the field of law enforcement, to include the duties, authority, responsibilities, and rights of the uniformed police officer. Emphasis is placed upon the function of patrol officers as it relates to the foundations of policing in America.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency.
  
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    CJT-1530 Community Policing


    3 Credits
    A study of the relationship between police and the community with recommendations for ways of working together to reduce crime. Emphasis is placed on policing in a culturally diverse society.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency.
  
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    CJT-1540 Police Management


    3 Credits
    Course has been re-numbered. See CJT-2570 .
  
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    CJT-1550 Juvenile Delinquency


    3 Credits
    Course has been re-numbered. See CJT-2580 .
  
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    CJT-1700 Victimology and Violence


    3 Credits
    The study of victimization, crime typologies, and the impact of crime on victims, offenders and society.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency.
  
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    CJT-1730 Introduction to Security


    3 Credits
    An introduction to the basic principles and concepts of security and asset protection, from historical and modern-day points of view. Emphasis is on the protection of assets, personnel, and facilities involving both private and government entities.
  
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    CJT-1740 Security Operations


    3 Credits
    An examination of the increasing role private security plays in crime prevention, detection and investigation. Emphasis is on physical and procedural operations.
  
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    CJT-2510 Criminal Law


    3 Credits
    A study of substantive criminal law, including elements of state and federal crimes. Constitutional limitations on the types of conduct that can be criminalized, affirmative defenses to criminal liability, appropriate criminal statutes, and interpretive court decisions will be examined.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency.
  
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    CJT-2530 Criminal Investigation


    3 Credits
    A study of the fundamental principles and procedures employed in the investigation of crime. Emphasis is placed on the investigation of specific crimes, the identification of sources of information and the procedures necessary for the proper handling of evidence. The course is designed to develop a working knowledge of the steps of investigation beginning with the initial security of the crime scene and concluding with the presentation of evidence and proper testimony in court.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency.
  
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    CJT-2540 Criminal Evidence and Procedure


    3 Credits
    An examination of the principles and techniques of criminal procedure employed during trials to determine the admissibility of physical and testimonial evidence. An analysis of laws and court decisions relating to admissibility is emphasized.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency.
  
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    CJT-2560 Terrorism and Biosecurity


    3 Credits
    A survey of historical, current and future acts of foreign and domestic terrorism. Emphasis is placed on the threat of terrorism, both nationally and Internationally, weapons of mass destruction, and biological, chemical, nuclear and cyber agents. Includes investigative methods and procedures and the development of response plans.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency.
  
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    CJT-2570 Police Management


    3 Credits
    A study of the administration of police to include the organizational structure, function, and theory related to the practice of police management.
    Prerequisite(s): CJT-1510  or permission of department.
    (Formerly CJT-1540 . Students may not receive credit for both CJT-1540  and CJT-2570.)
  
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    CJT-2580 Juvenile Delinquency


    3 Credits
    A study of the causes and trends of youth crime. The prediction, prevention, treatment, and control of juvenile delinquency by social control agencies is examined relative to social policies needed to reduce its incidence. The organization and procedures of the juvenile justice system will be explored.
    Prerequisite(s): CJT-1510  or permission of department.
    (Formerly CJT-1550 . Students may not receive credit for both CJT-1550  and CJT-2580.)
  
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    CJT-2800 Professional Ethics in Criminal Justice


    3 Credits
    Examines the decision-making process of those involved in the field of public safety, including law enforcement and corrections, as it relates to morals, values, integrity, discretion and authority. The course queries ethics relating to the fair and equal treatment of those involved in the criminal justice process to include criminal justice personnel, victims, and criminals. Topics relating to the history, definition, categories, and theories of ethics; lying and deception as it relates to the field of criminal justice; prejudice and discrimination in the field of criminal justice; and abuse of authority specific to the field of criminal justice will be examined.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency.
  
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    CJT-2900 Capstone Seminar in Criminal Justice


    3 Credits
    This course is the culmination of the criminal justice students’ academic experience. It serves to synthesize the knowledge gained from courses taken within the criminal justice curriculum and better prepare the graduate to progress to upper-level studies in the discipline, or for entry-level career positions in the criminal justice field. Among other requirements, the student will develop and prepare an individual research project that will be presented to the class, as well as an external audience.  
    Prerequisite(s): CJT-1510 , CJT-1520 , CJT-1530 , CJT-2510 , CJT-2530 , CJT-2540 , CJT-2580 , and CJT-2800  or permission of department.
    Capstone Course(s): In addition to completing prerequisite courses, students must also have completed a minimum of 45 credits and all required criminal justice (CJT) courses before enrolling in this course. A minimum GPA of 2.00 is also required.
  
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    CJT-2910 Internship


    1-3 Credits
    The internship is a practicum with measurable learning objectives designed to broaden the educational experience. Students are assigned to appropriate governmental and private criminal justice agencies. A maximum of six credits of cooperative education and internship experiences may be applied to any degree. These credits may not transfer to all four-year institutions. Contact the Career Services Office, Bladen Hall, Room 124, 301-546-0136, for more complete information.
  
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    CJT-2920 Internship


    1-3 Credits
    The internship is a practicum with measurable learning objectives designed to broaden the educational experience. Students are assigned to appropriate governmental and private criminal justice agencies. A maximum of six credits of cooperative education and internship experiences may be applied to any degree. These credits may not transfer to all four-year institutions. Contact the Career Services Office, Bladen Hall, Room 124, 301-546-0136, for more complete information.
  
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    CJT-2930 Internship


    1-3 Credits
    The internship is a practicum with measurable learning objectives designed to broaden the educational experience. Students are assigned to appropriate governmental and private criminal justice agencies. A maximum of six credits of cooperative education and internship experiences may be applied to any degree. These credits may not transfer to all four-year institutions. Contact the Career Services Office, Bladen Hall, Room 124, 301-546-0136, for more complete information.

Culinary Arts

Hospitality, Tourism, and Culinary Arts Department
Chesapeake Hall, Room 100 | 301-546-3090

  
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    CUL-1100 Introduction to Culinary Arts


    3 Credits
    Introductory food production class for culinary students. Topics include the theories and methods of cooking, vocabulary, and the development of safe and sanitary kitchen practices. Production items will include vegetable and starch preparation, stocks and soups, and egg cookery.
    Prerequisite(s): HSM-1550  completed or concurrent.
    2 class/2 lab hours.
  
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    CUL-1150 Food Production I


    3 Credits
    A continuation of CUL-1100 . Topics include stocks, soups, sauces, beef, pork and poultry items, vegetables, and starches. Utilizing recipes and techniques as presented in class, students will prepare a number of buffets.
    Prerequisite(s): CUL-1100 .
    1 class/4 lab hours.
  
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    CUL-1300 Baking Skills


    3 Credits
    An introductory course in the principles of baking, with emphasis on bakeshop ingredients, their function, measurement, and scaling. Scratch baked items to include quick breads and muffins, yeast breads, cookies, Danish pastries, and assorted pies.
    Prerequisite(s): CUL-1100 .
    1 class/4 lab hours.
  
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    CUL-2150 Food Production II


    3 Credits
    An advanced food production class. Production topics will include principles of plate presentation, entrée, starch, vegetables, seafood, veal, and lamb cookery. Additional topics will include menu construction, pricing, and production.
    Prerequisite(s): CUL-1150 .
    1 class/4 lab hours.
  
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    CUL-2200 Garde Manger and Catering


    3 Credits
    This course focuses on cold food preparation and presentation in buffet and catering applications, including appetizers, hors d’oeuvres, canapés, pates, sausages, terrines and buffet salads, buffet design, layout and execution, and menu planning.
    Prerequisite(s): CUL-2150 .
    1 class/4 lab hours.
  
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    CUL-2300 Advanced Baking and Pastry


    3 Credits
    A continuation of CUL-1300 . Topics include tarts, cakes, and restaurant-style desserts, production and use of sauces, and plate presentations. Students will be required to create a dessert menu and demonstrate baking proficiency through production of selected menu items.
    Prerequisite(s): CUL-1100  and CUL-1300 .
    1 class/4 lab hours.
  
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    CUL-2450 International Cuisine


    3 Credits
    A continuation of CUL-2150 . Production will include French, Italian, Asian, and other ethnic and regional cuisines. Discussion topics will include indigenous ingredients, flavors, cooking methods, and techniques.
    Prerequisite(s): CUL-2150 .
    1 class/4 lab hours.
  
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    CUL-2760 Internship


    1 Credits
    Students will complete a 30-hour work-based experience and prepare pre- and post-experience reports. It may be paid or unpaid and should match the students’ professional aspirations.
    Prerequisite(s): CUL-2150  and permission of the program coordinator.

Developmental English

Developmental English and Reading Department
Marlboro Hall, Room 2118 | 301-546-0495

DVE courses meet for 3 class hours and 2 open-lab hours per week or equivalent.

  
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    DVE-0009 Fundamental Language Skills


    0 Credits Equivalent Hours (4 EHS) Four equivalent hours (EHs) awarded for successful completion.
    Preparation for DVE-0011 . This course helps students write various types of clear, concise sentences and coherent paragraphs. It emphasizes basic sentence structure and includes practice with subjects and verbs, fragments and run-on sentences, and sequence of tenses.
    (Formerly DLS-0031. Students who have passed DLS-0031 should not take this course.)
    DVE courses meet for 3 class hours and 2 open-lab hours per week or equivalent.
  
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    DVE-0011 Developmental Composition


    0 Credits Equivalent Hours (4 EHS) Four equivalent hours (EHs) awarded for successful completion.
    Preparation for credit-level English. This course develops basic English skills and familiarizes students with the fundamental principles of written communication. It emphasizes writing clear, effective paragraphs, and correcting weaknesses in sentence structure, grammar, and usage.
    DVE courses meet for 3 class hours and 2 open-lab hours per week or equivalent.
  
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    DVE-0012 Foundations of Composition and Comprehension


    0 Credits Equivalent Hours (6 EHS) Six equivalent hours (EHs) awarded for successful completion.
    Designed to prepare students for college-level courses, specifically by improving skills in vocabulary, reading, comprehension, and effective written communications. Application of these skills will not only enable students to become more effective and efficient readers of their college textbooks but will also familiarize them with the fundamental principles of written communication. Emphasis will be placed on understanding and analyzing various texts and on writing clear and effective paragraphs or essays. DVE-0012 consists of the equivalent of thirty
    2.5-hour class sessions and 25 1-hour supervised laboratory sessions or documented tutoring sessions.
    DVE courses meet for 3 class hours and 2 open-lab hours per week or equivalent.

Developmental Learning Support

Learning Foundations Division
Marlboro Hall, Room 2118 | 301-546-0495

  
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    DLS-0011 Fundamental Arithmetic Skills


    0 Credits Equivalent Hours (2 EHS) Two equivalent hours (EHs) awarded for successful completion.
    Preparation for DVM-0031 . Review of basic arithmetic operations on whole numbers, fractions and decimals, including number properties.
  
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    DLS-0061 Fundamental Mathematics with Pre-Algebra


    Equivalent Hours 4
    Fundamental Mathematics with Pre-Algebra provides students with a review of basic mathematic concepts, algebra operations, solving linear equations, and applications using whole numbers, integers, fractions, and decimals, including number properties. This course includes one scheduled lab hour per week. This course will prepare student for entry into DVM-0071 .
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency or concurrent enrollment in DVR-0051  or satisfactory placement test score.
    4 class/1 lab hour per week

Developmental Math

Developmental Mathematics Department
Marlboro Hall, Room 2118 | 301-546-0495

  
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    DVM-0021 Arithmetic and Algebra Review


    0 Credits Equivalent Hours (1 EH) One equivalent hour (EH) awarded for successful completion.
    This is not a regular class in the DVM sequence. This is a review course only. Includes all content of DVM-0031  and DVM-0071 . The math placement exam must be taken on the last day of the course. This exam score will determine actual placement in the appropriate DVM or MAT class.
    1 class/1 lab hour per week.
  
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    DVM-0031 Prealgebra


    0 Credits Equivalent Hours (4 EHS) Four equivalent hours (EHs) awarded for successful completion.
    Preparation for DVM-0071 . Review of basic arithmetic operations; applications including ratio and proportion, percent, geometry, measurement and statistics; signed numbers; and equations.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency or concurrent enrollment in DVR-0051  and satisfactory basic mathematics placement test score.
    4 class/1 lab hour per week.
  
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    DVM-0071 Introductory Algebra


    0 Credits Equivalent Hours (4 EHS) Four equivalent hours (EHs) awarded for successful completion.
    Preparation for MAT-0104 . Linear equations and inequalities, graphing, polynomials, algebraic fractions, radicals, quadratic equations, and applications. Four credit-hour load equivalent.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency or concurrent enrollment in DVR-0061  and satisfactory placement test score or completion of DVM-0031  with grade of C or higher is required.
    4 class/1 lab hour per week.
  
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    DVM-0081 Elementary and Intermediate Algebra Review


    0 Credits Equivalent Hours (1 EH) One equivalent hour (EH) awarded for successful completion.
    This is not a regular class in the DVM sequence. This is a review course only. Includes all content from DVM-0071  and MAT-0104 . The math placement exam must be taken on the last day of the course. This exam score will determine actual placement in the appropriate DVM or MAT class.
    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory placement score or successful completion of DVM-0031 .
    1 class/1 lab hour per week.
  
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    MAT-0092 Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning


    Equivalent Hours 4
    Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning is a quantitative literacy-based course designed to provide the skills and conceptual understanding to succeed in a college-level statistics or a non-algebraic liberal arts mathematics course. The course will prepare students for success in future courses [MAT-1130 Mathematics for Liberal Arts, MAT-1140 Basic Statistics, or MAT-1190 Probability only] and will help develop skills for the workplace and as productive citizens. MAT-0092 does not satisfy General Education Mathematics requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): Math placement score and reading proficiency satisfied.
    Note: MAT-0092 does not satisfy the PGCC mathematics requirement for graduation and does not transfer to most four-year institutions. All students must earn a grade of C or higher in MAT-0092 before continuing with MAT-1130, 1140 or 1190 only. This is NOT a prerequisite for any algebra-based course.

Developmental Reading

Developmental English and Reading Department
Marlboro Hall, Room 2118 | 301-546-0495

  
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    DVR-0051 Developmental Reading


    0 Credits Equivalent Hours (4 EHS) Four equivalent hours (EHs) awarded for successful completion.
    This course develops basic reading skills including vocabulary, comprehension and study skills. It emphasizes using phonics and structure to analyze unfamiliar words, acquiring general vocabulary through context clues and affixes, and comprehending sentences and paragraphs through main ideas, details, inferences and fact and opinion.
    3 class/2 lab hours.
  
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    DVR-0061 College Reading and Study Skills


    0 Credits Equivalent Hours (4 EHS)
    This course improves students’ skills in vocabulary, comprehension, and studying. Application of these skills will enable a student to read his/her college textbooks more effectively and efficiently. Topics include topic, main idea, details, writing patterns, critical reading, and note taking. Four equivalent hours (EHs) awarded for successful completion. Successful completion meets the Reading proficiency required for enrollment in credit courses.
    3 class/2 lab hours.
    Students admitted to Prince George’s Community College before fall 2014 are required to take PAS-1010  Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning in the same semester as DVR-0061.
  
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    DVR-0071 Accelerated College Reading and Study Skills


    0 Credits Equivalent Hours (2 EHS) Two equivalent hours (EHs) awarded for successful completion. Students must enroll in DVR-0061 if this course is failed.
    Preparation for credit courses requiring the reading prerequisite. A fast-paced course with emphasis on critical reading and thinking, summarizing, paraphrasing as well as the basic reading elements-main ideas, supporting details, inferences, and patterns of organization.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading Placement Test score of 70-78.

Economics

Business Studies Department
Marlboro Hall, Room 2054 | 301-546-0525

  
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    ECN-1010 Economic Development


    3 Credits
    Development of American capitalism, including evolution of the capitalistic system and roles of agriculture, manufacturing, trade, transportation, communication, money and banking, government and international trade.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency.
  
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    ECN-1030 Principles of Macroeconomics


    3 Credits
    First semester of university-parallel sequence. Introduction to economic macroanalysis, emphasizing gross national product, national income, consumption, investment, taxation, government spending, and monetary and fiscal policies. Social sciences general education class.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading and mathematics proficiencies or DVM-0071  completed or concurrent.
  
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    ECN-1040 Principles of Microeconomics


    3 Credits
    Course has been re-numbered. See ECN-2040 .
  
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    ECN-2040 Principles of Microeconomics


    3 Credits
    Second semester of university-parallel sequence. Introduction to economic microanalysis, focusing on the role of the individual consumer, and the behavior of businesses under different market conditions. Social sciences general education class.
    Prerequisite(s): ECN-1030 .
    (Formerly ECN-1040 . Students may not receive credit for both ECN-1040  and ECN-2040.)
  
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    ECN-2910 Cooperative Education


    1-3 Credits
    A maximum of six credits of cooperative education and internship experiences may be applied to any degree. These credits may not transfer to all four-year institutions. Contact the Career Services Office, Bladen Hall, Room 124, 301-546-0136, for more complete information.
  
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    ECN-2920 Cooperative Education


    1-3 Credits
    A maximum of six credits of cooperative education and internship experiences may be applied to any degree. These credits may not transfer to all four-year institutions. Contact the Career Services Office, Bladen Hall, Room 124, 301-546-0136, for more complete information.
  
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    ECN-2930 Cooperative Education


    1-3 Credits
    A maximum of six credits of cooperative education and internship experiences may be applied to any degree. These credits may not transfer to all four-year institutions. Contact the Career Services Office, Bladen Hall, Room 124, 301-546-0136, for more complete information.

Emergency Medical Technician

Many former EMT courses are now located under a new subject heading, Paramedic (PMD)

  
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    EMT-1000 Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Theory


    6 Credits
    Prepares student in basic medical pre-hospital emergency care, following the standards and guidelines set by the Maryland Institute of Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS), the accrediting agency for EMT programs in Maryland. Lecture topics include anatomy and physiology of the chest, abdomen, and head; patient assessment; basic life support, trauma and medical emergencies; immobilization techniques; and childbirth. Lab sessions focus on skill mastery in caring for these patients, including the continued development of critical thinking skills and the development and implementation of treat plans for patients with various disease and traumatic states encountered in the pre-hospital environment. Continued attention is given to preparation for a role as an EMT team leader, patient advocate and for entry-level practice as an Emergency Medical Technician professional in the pre-hospital environment.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency and minimum age of 18. Corequisite(s): EMT-1100 .
    4 class/4 lab hours.
  
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    EMT-1100 Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Clinical


    4 Credits
    Provides the Emergency Medical Technician student with an opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge and skills introduced in EMT-1000 . Precepted patient care experiences are facilitated through ride-alongs on basic ambulances in the Prince George’s County Fire/EMS Department, a field clinical affiliate of the program.
    Prerequisite(s): Reading proficiency and minimum age of 18. Corequisite(s): EMT-1100.
    8 clinical hours.

Engineering

Physical Sciences and Engineering Department
Chesapeake Hall, Room 100 | 301-546-0420

A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.

  
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    EGR-1010 Introductory Engineering


    3 Credits
    This course introduces the student to the theory and practice of engineering. The course has four main parts, each part covering important aspects of engineering, giving the student a full picture of the career they are about to embark upon. The first part will help the student understand what an engineer is and what type of work they would be expected to perform in society. Included in this will be discussions of ethics and group dynamics. The second part will deal with higher level engineering concepts. This will be developed in an application area such as a research laboratory giving students exposure to professional practices common in all engineering disciplines. A number of professional papers will be reviewed leading to the creation of a hypothetical laboratory emphasizing the interaction common to all engineering disciplines. The third part will cover fundamental aspects of engineering including drawing, modeling, problem solving, design, and laboratory experimentation. Basic computer skills will be developed using MATLAB, Fortran, C, or a similar high level computer language. Finally a team project will constitute the fourth part. The teams will be expected to develop a product using a number of engineering and software skills. Teamwork along with communication skills (oral, written, and graphical) is exercised throughout the course.
    Prerequisite(s): EGR-1140  or EGR-1210  with grade of C or higher. MAT-1360  or MAT-1370  with grade of C or higher. MAT-2410  and EGL-1010  completed or concurrent.
    2 class/3 lab hours.
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.
  
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    EGR-1140 Computer Programming for Engineers and Scientists


    3 Credits
    This is a high-level introduction to computer tools and computer programming for the engineer and scientist. The goal is to develop within the student sufficient knowledge to perform analysis using common engineering and science programming languages. Topics will include algorithm analysis and solution, program structures, data structures, modular design, and overviews of the computer hardware, various computer tools available to solve real world problems and object-oriented structure. A variety of languages will be introduced such as MATLAB, Fortran, and C with a primary emphasis on one of these languages. The results will be to ensure that from the primary languages a student can easily master the other languages. Along with the aforementioned languages, a number of engineering specific languages such as LABView, Spice, and VHDL will be introduced and practiced in laboratory.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT-1360  completed or concurrent with grade of C or higher.
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.
  
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    EGR-1210 Computer Science I


    4 Credits
    Computer science concepts studied from theoretical and practical viewpoints, including program analysis and life cycle design, formal syntactics of the Java or other object oriented language, program control structures, subprograms, algorithm design and analysis, recursion, computer architecture, number systems, and data storage. Applications studied include numerical methods, creating libraries, character processing, simulating logic circuits, sorting, searching, set operations, use of matrices. Object Oriented Programming introduced. Structured programming and Object Design stressed. Java based.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT-2410  completed or concurrent; INT-1030 or INT-1200 or INT-2130  recommended.
    3 class/3 lab hrs.
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.
  
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    EGR-1220 Computer Science II


    4 Credits
    Introduces theoretical and practical treatment of abstract data types and data structures including lists, strings, stacks, queues, search trees, and hash tables. Objected Oriented Programming methodology and Java classes are used to implement ADT. Software life cycle is studied. Formal topics include introduction to theory of computation including parsing context free grammars, Finite State Machines, expression evaluation and notation, program analysis and verification.
    Prerequisite(s): EGR-1210  and MAT-2420  completed or concurrent.
    3 class/3 lab hrs.
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.
  
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    EGR-2030 Circuit Analysis


    4 Credits
    This course will introduce the advanced student to the theory of circuit analysis by studying concepts using complex analysis techniques that apply to the electrical engineering, general engineering, and advanced science student alike. Classical analysis techniques of AC/DC circuits using Kirchoff’s laws, mesh and nodal methods, phasor notation, superposition, the application of Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorem, etc. will be examined. Other topics will include transient analysis of first- and second-order circuits, frequency response, polyphase circuits, two-port networks, diodes, transistors, amplifiers, and digital logic. Different tools to aid in the solution of circuits will be performed such as Laplace transforms, transfer functions in the solution of transient analysis, and FFTs for signal analysis. Analysis using different computer simulation techniques will be introduced for a variety of circuits. This introduction will serve as a primer for more advanced courses in the junior and senior year of college. Some design of circuit boards and testing will also be required in this course. Since circuit analysis is a general concept in engineering, this course will examine throughout the course circuit elements (resistors, capacitors, inductors, sources, etc.) and their underlying concepts extending circuit analysis to all the different scientific and engineering fields. Teamwork along with communication skills (oral, written, and graphical) is exercised throughout the course.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT-2430 , EGR-1010 , and PHY-1030  with grades of C or higher; MAT-2460  completed or concurrent.
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.
  
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    EGR-2050 Signals and Systems: Modeling, Computation, and Analysis


    4 Credits
    Solving high-level applications in engineering, physics, chemistry, and biology require an understanding of modeling at a system level. To fully prepare a student, this course emphasizes system analysis. Crucial to modeling in the modern world is an understanding of the computational modeling as well as the mathematical formulation, therefore a variety of numerical/computational methods will be reviewed in the first part of the course and extended for the purpose of understanding the computational methods required to do modeling in a modern setting. Subjects to be studied include error analysis, roots of non-linear equations, solving systems of linear equations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and eigenfunctions, optimization, curve fitting including splines, Fourier analysis, modeling, numerical differentiation and integration, and numerical solving of differential equations including, but not limited to, predictor-corrector methods and finite element analysis. It will be assumed that the student is at least partially familiar with these concepts from previous mathematics class. Extra study may be required for a student lacking these skills. These concepts will be extended into computational methods that are useful in analyzing signals and systems. Topics will include representation of systems and signals, transfer functions, and filters. The relationship between linear systems and both discrete time and continuous time signals and sampling will be explored and used to better understand real world applications. Practical issues of representation and sampling of signals will be explored with particular emphasis to best case solutions. This will be extended into the study and use of a number of filters, in particular digital filters. Topics will include OTFs, DFTs, Laplace transforms, Z-transforms, Radon transforms, and convolutions. Lastly, there will be extensive surveys of a number of advanced subjects including molecular dynamics, percolation, and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Some new mathematical concepts will be introduced in the class. A number of software packages and languages important to engineering are surveyed with primary emphasis on mastering one high-level language such as MATLAB/Octave, C/ gcc/g++, or Fortran/gfortran. This course, recognizing the fact that all engineers and scientists need the aforementioned topics, will emphasize a number of case studies in such areas as mechanical, civil, environmental, electrical, aerospace, chemical, and biological engineering, as well as in the sciences. Teamwork along with communication skills (oral, written, and graphical) is exercised throughout the course.
    Prerequisite(s): EGR-1010 , EGR-1140 , and MAT-2420  
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.
  
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    EGR-2060 Thermodynamics


    3 Credits
    Principles of macroscopic thermodynamics, focusing on mass transport and energy, heat and work, the properties of pure substances and mixtures, the first and second laws, and reversible cycles. This course extends the thermodynamic properties found in chemistry courses. These concepts universally are those in the ideal gas region which are then completed going from the ideal gas region, to the saturated region, the superheated region, and the compressed liquid region. The course is approached from the engineering point of view (as opposed to a physics point of view), making extensive use of thermodynamic tables. Many of the systems analyzed evolve from one region into another (saturated to super heated, etc,). This course prepares the student for the more complex courses in higher-level civil, mechanical, and aerospace engineering courses. Students will become familiar with the several methods of analyzing various systems undergoing heat transfer processes. Students will be able to analyze systems using the proper mathematical tools and physical laws such as The First Law of Thermodynamics, The First Law for Control Volumes, The Second Law of Thermodynamics, and The Second Law for Control Volumes. All problems require university-level reading skills, the ability to abstract, analyze systems mathematically, and graphically. Introduces the foundations of the chemistry and physics of materials used in engineering applications.
    Prerequisite(s): EGR-1010 , MAT-2410 , PHY-1030 , and CHM-1020 .
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.
  
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    EGR-2200 Engineering Mechanics


    3 Credits
    Principles of mechanics, including points, bodies, and assemblies in static equilibrium. Areas examined will include trusses, frames, beams, cables, machines, point and distributed loading, and moments of inertia, scalar, and vector analysis. More advanced topics will include deformable bodies and stress, strain, torsion, shear, bending, and fracture. Introduction to kinetics, kinematics, and strength of materials.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT-2410  and EGR-1010  with grades of C or higher; PHY-1030  and MAT-2420  completed or concurrent.
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.
  
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    EGR-2210 Advanced Engineering Mechanics


    3 Credits
    Kinematics and kinetics of particles, systems, and bodies. Topics include work and energy, impulse and momentum, rigid body motion, and rotating bodies. More advanced topics will include the general theorems for systems of particles and the inertia tensor.
    Prerequisite(s): EGR-1010  and EGR-2220  with grades of C or higher.
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.
  
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    EGR-2220 Solid Mechanics


    3 Credits
    Topics in deformable bodies in axial, torsional, bending, and combined loading. This course extends the introductory strength of materials to intermediate continuum mechanics. Other topics include statically indeterminate and temperature effect analysis; beam, column, and pressure vessel configurations. More advanced topics include structural stability, analysis of one- and two-dimensional structures, inelastic material behavior, and energy methods.
    Prerequisite(s): EGR-1010  and EGR-2200  with a grade of C or higher.
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.
  
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    EGR-2300 Materials Science for Engineers and Scientists


    3 Credits
    Introduces the foundations of the chemistry and physics of materials used in engineering applications. Develops the relationship between the atomic and molecular structure of materials and the macroscopic properties and performance of engineering material. In particular, includes thorough discussion of the chemical and physical properties of metals, ceramics, polymers, semiconductors, superconductors, and nanomaterials.
    Prerequisite(s): EGR-1010  and CHM-1020  or CHM-2000 .
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.
  
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    EGR-2440 Digital Logic Design


    3 Credits
    Introduction to the theory and practice of logic (digital) circuits in order to foster an understanding of modern electrical circuits. Includes but is not limited to the following subjects: Number systems and base conversions; Boolean algebra, truth tables, logic circuits, logic circuits synthesis and implementation; Karnaugh maps (and other strategies of minimization); sequential logic; flip-flops; registers; counters; processors (simple); programmable logic devices; and characteristics of logic families. Some physical hardware is discussed including limitations. This course emphasizes the elements used to create logic circuits and the software (CAD/EDA) used to design and simulate logic circuits. Teamwork along with communication skills (oral, written, and graphical) is exercised throughout the course.
    Prerequisite(s): EGR-1010 , MAT-2420 , and PHY-1030  with grades of C or higher; PHY-2030  completed or concurrent.
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.
  
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    EGR-2450 Electronic and Digital Circuit Laboratory


    2 Credits
    Introduction to basic circuit measurement techniques and laboratory equipment (DMM, analog and digital oscilloscope, power supply, function generator, Digital Logic Analyzers) including the limitations and inaccuracies inherent in any measurement device. Design, construction, and performance measurement of circuits containing passive elements, digital logic circuits, transformers, diodes, and operational amplifiers. In addition, simulation tools to design circuits and to analyze performance will be used extending work performed in digital logic design and circuit analysis. Knowledge of both steady state response and transient response is required for a number of experiments. Extensive analysis will be demonstrated in both laboratory books and laboratory reports. Knowledge of statistical analysis as well as other methods of analysis will be required in this class.
    Prerequisite(s): EGR-1010  and EGR-2440  with grade of C or higher; EGR-2030  completed or concurrent.
    2 class/3 lab hours.
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.
  
  •  

    EGR-2910 Cooperative Education


    1-3 Credits
    A maximum of six credits of cooperative education and internship experiences may be applied to any degree. These credits may not transfer to all four-year institutions. Contact the Career Services Office, Bladen Hall, Room 124, 301-546-0136, for more complete information.
  
  •  

    EGR-2920 Cooperative Education


    1-3 Credits
    A maximum of six credits of cooperative education and internship experiences may be applied to any degree. These credits may not transfer to all four-year institutions. Contact the Career Services Office, Bladen Hall, Room 124, 301-546-0136, for more complete information.
  
  •  

    EGR-2930 Cooperative Education


    1-3 Credits
    A maximum of six credits of cooperative education and internship experiences may be applied to any degree. These credits may not transfer to all four-year institutions. Contact the Career Services Office, Bladen Hall, Room 124, 301-546-0136, for more complete information.
  
  •  

    EGR-2990H Honors Seminar in Engineering and Science (Special Topics)


    1 Credit
    Seminar course that introduces and studies emerging issues in science, engineering, technology, and mathematics. Topics vary by semester. Also offered as BIO-2990H  and CHM-2990H .
    Prerequisite(s): A 3.00 GPA, completion of a minimum of 18 credits in courses offered by the division of Sciences, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, and permission of the instructor or the honors program coordinator.
    A grade of C or higher is required for any course used to satisfy a prerequisite for any other course.

Engineering Technology

Information and Engineering Technology Department
Center for Advanced Technology, Room 129 | 301-546-0751

  
  •  

    ENT-1600 Introduction to CAD with AutoCAD


    3 Credits
    Techniques for creating, editing and dimensioning two-dimensional CAD drawings.
    Prerequisite(s): Drafting background helpful but not required.
    2 class/2 lab hours.
  
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    ENT-1640 Three-Dimensional CAD with AutoCAD


    3 Credits
    Creation of three-dimensional AutoCAD drawings using wireframe models, surface models and solid models.
    Prerequisite(s): ENT-1600 .
    2 class/2 lab hours.
  
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    ENT-1680 Revit Architecture and BIM


    3 Credits
    Students will create integrated architectural project models and document their designs with linked two-dimensional drawings using Autodesk’s Revit Architecture. Introduction to the concepts of Building Information Modeling (BIM) and the tools for parametric building design and documentation. Using Revit to produce the schematic design, construction documentation, and design visualization.
    Prerequisite(s): No prerequisites, but architecture or drafting background helpful.
    2 class/2 lab hours.
  
  •  

    ENT-1710 Circuits and Measurement Techniques


    3 Credits
    Analysis of linear electronic circuits and systems. Includes network theorems and hands-on use of electronic test equipment.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT-0104  or MAT-1340 , completed or concurrent.
    1 class/1 recitation/5 lab hours (open-lab format).
  
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    ENT-1720 Circuit Analysis and Design


    3 Credits
    Analysis and design of reactive circuits, including use of phasor and j-operator techniques. Covers capacitors, inductors, transformers and filters, and use of electronic instrumentation.
    Prerequisite(s): ENT-1710 ; MAT-0104  or MAT-1340  or higher, completed or concurrent.
    1 class/1 recitation/5 lab hours (open-lab format).
  
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    ENT-1770 Introduction to Computing for Technology


    3 Credits
    Introduction to operating systems, such as Linux and Windows; introduction to a high-level programming language, such as Visual Basic; introduction to a graphical and data acquisition language, such as LabVIEW.
    Prerequisite(s): ENT-1710  completed or concurrent or permission of department chair.
    2 class/3 lab hours.
  
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    ENT-1780 Analog Circuits


    4 Credits
    Course has been re-numbered. See ENT-2710 .
  
  •  

    ENT-1800 Digital Circuits


    4 Credits
    Course has been re-numbered. See ENT-2740 .
  
  •  

    ENT-1840 Introduction to Personal Computer Hardware


    3 Credits
    See INT-1540  Computer Hardware I: A+ Preparation.
  
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    ENT-1850 Circuit Evaluation and Repair


    2 Credits
    Reverse engineering from circuit to schematic, troubleshooting techniques, test equipment and assembly techniques.
    Prerequisite(s): ENT-1710 .
    1 class/3 lab hours (open-lab format).
  
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    ENT-1890 Network Hardware


    3 Credits
    See INT-1550  Introduction to Networks: Network+ Preparation.
  
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    ENT-1900 Introduction to Space Technology


    3 Credits
    Satellite technology, reliability, and testing. Includes propulsion and launch systems, spacecraft structures, power systems, telemetry, tracking, and command/control/communication operations.
    Prerequisite(s): MAT-0104  or MAT-1340  or higher, completed or concurrent or permission of department chair.
  
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    ENT-1940 Router Technology I: Network Fundamentals


    4 Credits
    See INT-1450  CCNA 1: Introduction to Cisco Networking
  
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    ENT-1950 Router Technology II: Routing Protocols


    4 Credits
    See INT-1460  CCNA 2: Routing and Switching Essentials
  
  •  

    ENT-1960 Router Technology III: LAN Switching and Wireless


    4 Credits
    See INT-2450  CCNA 3: Scaling Networks
  
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    ENT-1970 Router Technology IV: Wide Area Networks


    4 Credits
    See INT-2460  CCNA 4: Connecting Networks
  
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    ENT-2200 High-Reliability Soldering and Fabrication


    2 Credits
    Hands-on application of industry standards to hand soldering of components to connectors and both through-hole and surface-mount circuit boards. Includes relevant standards, safety and ESD requirements, and inspection techniques. Students who successfully complete the course are eligible for IPC J-STD 001 certification.
    Prerequisite(s): ENT-1710  or permission of department chair.
    1 class/2 lab hours.
  
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    ENT-2660 Customizing AutoCAD


    3 Credits
    Customizing and maximizing AutoCAD via macros, scripts and slides. Students will create their own menus, icons and dialog boxes. Introduction to AutoLISP.
    Prerequisite(s): ENT-1600 .
    2 class/2 lab hours.
  
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    ENT-2680 CAD Portfolio Development


    3 Credits
    Students, working individually or in teams, will create a set of CAD drawings using techniques learned in earlier CAD courses.
    Prerequisite(s): ENT-1600 .
    Individual-study course equivalent to 2 class/ 2 lab hours.
  
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    ENT-2710 Analog Circuits


    4 Credits
    Diodes, transistors, simple amplifiers, power supplies, operational amplifiers, and integrated circuits.
    Prerequisite(s): ENT-1710  completed and MAT 1340  or higher, completed or concurrent.
    (Formerly ENT-1780 . Students may not receive credit for both ENT-1780  and ENT-2710.) 3 class/3 lab hours.
  
  •  

    ENT-2730 Electronic Communication


    4 Credits
    AM, FM, and SSB circuits using oscillators, modulators, audio/RF amplifiers, mixers, and detectors.
    Prerequisite(s): ENT 2710 ; and MAT-1340  or higher, completed or concurrent.
    3 class/3 lab hours.
 

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