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    Prince George's Community College
   
 
  Sep 19, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Academic Catalog

Academic Preparation



In order to prepare students for success, the college provides students with opportunities to develop any academic skills that may be needed before enrolling in certain credit-level courses. Credit courses have prerequisites that are fulfilled by academic preparation courses in reading, writing, mathematics, or English as a Second Language (ESL). This chapter describes the various academic preparation courses at the college and their placement policies and assessment.

Placement Testing

Placement tests often determine the courses into which students are initially placed. The scores on these tests determine the courses in which students are allowed to enroll; as such it is important that students prepare for these tests and take them seriously.

The Accuplacer placement test is an untimed, computer-based test with several sections. The reading and writing portions of the Accuplacer placement test evaluate reading comprehension and sentence skills. The mathematics placement tests consist of arithmetic, elementary algebra, and college-level mathematics.

The Michigan test is designed for non-native English speakers. This paper test includes grammar, vocabulary, reading comprehension, and a writing sample.

Scores from the Accuplacer and Michigan tests are used to determine college readiness in mathematics, reading, writing, and ESL. Placement may be determined by a combination of test scores and other factors such as a writing sample or other courses the student is eligible to take. Placement tests may be taken twice during a two year period. The higher score from either test will be used. Placement tests can only be taken before enrolling in a preparatory course or sequence. Students whose Michigan test score and writing sample do not place them into ESL-0081  will be referred to Transition ESL (for more information about Transition ESL, see About WDCE ).

For entering students who have completed the ACT or SAT these scores may be used in lieu of the Accuplacer and the Michigan test to determine initial course placement. For more information on how scores on these tests may impact initial placement, see Admission to College .

Academic Preparation Course Sequences

Students who successfully progress through the academic preparation sequence earn equivalent hours (EH) rather than credit hours. The EH is the college’s method for documenting completion of these preparation courses. Grades in these courses will affect financial aid eligibility but will not be counted toward graduation. EHs permit the accumulation, updating, and transfer of student’s academic records.

Other Considerations

Academic preparation courses may be available in several different formats. These formats include condensed courses taught in 5-weeks to 10-weeks, 12-weeks to 15-weeks, one-day-a-week, and online and hybrid formats. Selecting the right format is important as not all formats are right for every student. Summer classes are usually offered in a five-week format, meeting four days per week. Students who can concentrate on their academic workload with minimal job responsibilities tend to do well in this format. Students should expect to spend significant time on homework each day the class meets.

Most course sections are 12-15 weeks. These formats usually meet twice or more per week. This allows students a maximum amount of time to process the content and complete assignments. These formats are appropriate for most students, providing that they select a section appropriate for their work/life schedule.

A two-week accelerated reading course is offered for those students whose initial reading score on the Accuplacer Test is 70 to 78.  The course is condensed, intensive, and uses a flipped classroom model.    It meets Monday through Friday for 2 hours each day.  Students must be focused.  Attendance in all sessions is critical.  Students should expect to spend significant time on homework and in-class assignments.

Eight-week and 10-week classes are condensed and intensive. Classes in these formats usually meet for more time per session or more days per week. This requires students to grasp content quickly. Students who have received a B or higher in prerequisite courses or students with a strong academic background should consider this format.

Classes that meet once a week require students to be self-directed learners and schedule frequent study time between class meetings. Similarly, online and hybrid classes require students to be self-directed learners. Adherence to deadlines and proficiency with computers are critical to success in these course formats.

For all courses in the academic preparation sequences, starting with solid time management will build a firm foundation for success in college-level courses.

Developmental English

The Developmental English (DVE) sequence includes up to three courses, depending on initial placement, that enable students to become more effective and efficient in written communication. The courses in this sequence develop the basic grammar and composition skills necessary for writing at the college level. These skills include sentence and paragraph structure and short essay writing skills. When this sequence is completed, students will have met the prerequisite required for college-level English courses.

The courses in the DVE sequence span two departments, the Developmental English and Reading Department and the English Department. The following table provides an overview of the sequence and the order of courses leading up to college-level courses. Note that the starting point for the sequence varies by initial course placement.

Developmental English (DVE) Placement and Courses

Accuplacer Sentence Structure Test Score Course Placement
Sentence 20-43 DVE-0009  
Sentence 44-68 DVE-0011  
Sentence 58-68 / Reading 62-78 DVE-0012  (optional)
Sentence 69-89 ESL-0100  

Important: Students who test into any of the courses in the DVE sequence must enroll in the courses in their first 15 billable credits at the college and remain in the DVE sequence in each successive semester until EGL-0100  is completed.

Additional DVE Sequence Information

For detailed course descriptions, see Course Descriptions .

Attendance Requirements and Course Lab

Students are expected to attend all regularly scheduled class meetings. Poor attendance may significantly impact the overall grade in the course. In addition to the regular class meetings, all developmental reading students are required to complete 15 clock hours of lab activities in the Marlboro Learning Lab. Ten additional lab hours will be earned by completing special assignments given to students by their instructors.

Possible Grades and When Students Need to Repeat a Course

Content mastery is important for student success. Students earning less than 70 percent must repeat the course.

Department Contact Information

For more information on the DVE sequence, contact the department chair or academic dean.

  Mirian Torain, Department Chair
Developmental English and Reading
Marlboro Hall, Room 2145
301-546-5259
Dr. Beverly Reed, Dean
Learning Foundations
Marlboro Hall, Room 2118
301-546-0495
  Beth Baldwin, Interim Department Chair
English (for EGL-0100)
Marlboro Hall, Room 3071
301-546-0564
Vacant, Dean
Liberal Arts
Marlboro Hall, Room 3077
301-546-3040

ALP English

The PGCC English Department’s Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) allows qualified students to complete English 0100 and English 1010 in one semester instead of two. After successfully completing ALP, students can enroll in Composition II.

ALP English (EGL) consists of two paired classes, EGL-1010P  (equivalent to EGL-1010 ) and EGL-0100P  (equivalent to EGL-0100 ).

Each ALP student takes EGL-1010P  with 21 other students - 9 other ALP students and 12 students who placed directly into EGL-1010 . Immediately following the 1010 class session, ALP students meet for another class period (EGL-0100P ) with the other 9 ALP students and the same instructor they have for 1010. ALP students receive a grade for each course (EGL-0100P  and EGL-1010P ) and must successfully pass both courses in order to move on to Composition II.

ALP English is open only to students whose test scores indicate that they are prepared for a rigorous and accelerated English course. To be eligible for ALP, students must score between 79 and 89 on the English part of the Accuplacer (sentence skills) and above 79 on the Accuplacer Reading Test. In addition, in order to be eligible for ALP, students must not have attempted EGL-0100 , 1000, or 100 before.

The ALP course offers several important benefits to students. ALP students save money because they pay for 6 credits (3 for EGL-1010P  and 3 for EGL-0100P ) rather than 7 (3 for EGL-1010  and 4 for EGL-0100 ). ALP students also save time by completing two courses in a single semester. Finally, and most importantly, ALP students receive individualized instruction and an enhanced EGL-1010  experience. They have the same instructor for both EGL-1010P  and EGL-0100P , and sections of EGL-0100P  are limited to just 10 students.

Developmental Reading

The Developmental Reading (DVR) sequence includes up to two courses, depending on a student’s initial placement. These courses enable students to become more effective and efficient readers of their college textbooks. The courses in this sequence develop the basic reading skills necessary for reading at the college level. These skills include vocabulary, comprehension, critical thinking, and study skills. When this sequence is completed, students will have met the reading proficiency prerequisite required for many college courses.

The following table provides an overview of the sequence and the order of reading courses leading to college-level courses. Note that the guidelines below are for students who place into only one developmental course. If students place into more than one developmental course, their initial placements may not reflect what is in the table. The starting point for the sequence varies by initial course placement.

Developmental Reading (DVR) Placement and Courses

Accuplacer Reading Test Score Course Placement
Reading 20-53 DVR-0051  
Reading 54-78 DVR-0061  
Reading 70-78 (optional) DVR-0071  

Important: Students who test into any of the DVR courses are required to enroll in them in their first semester of attendance, and remain in the DVR sequence until it is completed.

Additional DVR Sequence Information

For detailed course descriptions, see Course Descriptions .

Attendance Requirements and Course Lab

Students are expected to attend all regularly scheduled class meetings. Poor attendance may significantly impact the overall grade in the course. In addition to the regular class meetings, all developmental reading students are required to complete 15 clock hours of lab activities in the Marlboro Learning Lab. Ten additional lab hours will be given to students by instructors.

Possible Grades and When Students Need to Repeat a Course

Content mastery is important for student success. Students earning less than 70 percent must repeat the course.

Department Contact Information

For more information on the DVR sequence, contact the department chair or academic dean.

  Mirian Torain, Department Chair
Developmental English and Reading
Marlboro Hall, Room 2145
301-546-5259
Dr. Beverly Reed, Dean
Learning Foundations
Marlboro Hall, Room 2118
301-546-0495

Developmental Mathematics

Developmental Mathematics (DVM) includes up to four courses, depending on initial placement, that prepare students for success in college-level mathematics courses. The courses develop the basic quantitative and problem-solving skills necessary for mathematics at the college level. These skills include basic arithmetic operations, algebra skills including expressions, functions, and the solution of equations, and applications.

The following table provides an overview of the Developmental Mathematics courses leading to college-level courses. Note that the starting point varies by initial course placement.

Developmental Math (DVM) Placement and Courses

Accuplacer Test Score Course Placement
Elementary Algebra below 42 DLS-0061
Elementary Algebra 42-81 DVM-0071 
Elementary Algebra 82+ MAT-0104  
   

Important: Students who test into any of the DVM courses must enroll in the courses in their first 15 billable credits at the college and remain in the developmental mathematics sequence in each successive semester until MAT-0104  is completed.

Additional DVM Sequence Information

For detailed course descriptions, see Course Descriptions .

Developmental Mathematics Sequence

When students complete the Developmental Math Sequence (DMS), which could include DVM-0071  and/or MAT-0104  (depending on initial placement), they will have met the prerequisite required for college-level mathematics courses. The courses in the DMS span two departments, the Developmental Mathematics Department and the Mathematics Department.

DMS Redesign

The DMS has been redesigned to help students complete the sequence and be successful in credit-level mathematics courses needed to earn a degree. The redesigned DVM-0071  and MAT-0104  classes are very different from traditional mathematics classes. They meet in modular computer classrooms featuring an individualized computer-based program of study using a sequence of modules. Students must master the content of one module before moving to the next module. An instructor-tutor team is assigned to each class and provides students with guidance, facilitates mini-lessons, and provides students with supplemental learning activities as needed. This newly designed model offers students the opportunity to take an active role in the learning process and to progress more rapidly through the course sequence, possibly reducing the time required to complete developmental coursework.

Attendance Requirements and Course Lab

Students are expected to attend all regularly scheduled class meetings. Poor attendance may significantly impact concept mastery and the overall grade in the course. Marlboro Learning Lab and Math Learning Center are available for students to work independently or with tutor assistance outside of class, though lab attendance is not a course requirement.

Possible Grades and When Students Need to Repeat a Course

Content mastery is important for student success. Students earning less than 80 percent must repeat the course.

Review Courses

Students often need a refresher or review course prior to enrolling in developmental mathematics. The following courses are available depending on placement criteria.

DVM-0021 , Arithmetic and Algebra Review, is not part of the DMS. This course reviews material from DLS-0061 and DVM-0071 . The Accuplacer math placement exam is taken on the last day of the course, and the exam score determines placement in the appropriate DVM or MAT course.

DVM-0081 , Elementary and Intermediate Algebra Review, is not part of the DMS. This course review includes material from DVM-0071  and MAT-0104 . The Accuplacer math placement exam is taken on the last day of the course, and the exam score determines placement in the appropriate DVM or MAT course.

Department Contact Information

For more information on the DMS sequence, contact the department chair or academic dean.

  Dr. Brenda Teal, Department Chair
Developmental Mathematics
Marlboro Hall, Room 3127
301-546-0657
Dr. Beverly Reed, Dean
Learning Foundations
Marlboro Hall, Room 2118
301-546-0495
  Leslie Wojciechowicz, Department Chair
Mathematics (MAT-0104)
Marlboro Hall, Room 3046
301-546-0421
Dr. Christine Barrow, Dean
Sciences, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)
Chesapeake Hall, Room 215
301-546-0419

English as a Second Language

The English as a Second Language (ESL) sequence includes up to eight courses, which upon completion enable students to participate successfully in college courses. Depending on initial assessment, English language learners are placed in various courses in academic English. The courses in this sequence develop reading, oral communication, grammar, and writing, necessary for academic success.

There are two types of courses in the ESL sequence: grammar/writing and reading. Five classes focus on grammar and writing skills: ESL-0100 , ESL-0101 , ESL-0102 , ESL-0201 , and ESL-0202 . Reading skills and oral communication are taught in ESL-0081 , ESL-0105 , and ESL-0106 .

Once students complete ESL-0105 , they are eligible for and encouraged to take the math placement test. Math (DVM or MAT) courses may be taken after successfully completing ESL-0105 . Successful completion of ESL-0106  meets the prerequisite for courses requiring reading proficiency.

A grade of C constitutes a passing grade in ESL.

The following table provides an overview of the sequence and the order of courses leading up to college-level courses. These courses follow two tracks, the ESL grammar/writing track and the ESL reading track. Note that the starting point for the sequence varies by initial course placement.

English as a Second Language (ESL) Sequence Placement and Courses

  ESL Grammar/Writing ESL Reading/Vocabulary Important Notes
Basic
  ESL-0100 1 ESL-0081   Must complete ESL-0081  and ESL-0100  prior to enrollment in ESL-0105  
Intermediate
Level 1 ESL-0101      
    ESL-0105   Eligible for math placement test after ESL-0105  is completed
Level 2 ESL-0102     Must complete ESL-0105  and ESL-0102  prior to enrollment in ESL-0106  
Advanced
Level 1 ESL-0201      
    ESL-0106   After completion of ESL-0106 , eligible for courses with reading prerequisite
Level 2 ESL-0202      
College-level
  EGL-1010     Must complete ESL-0106  and ESL-0202  prior to enrollment in EGL-1010  

1 Students whose Michigan test score and writing sample do not place them into ESL-0100 /ESL-0081  will be referred to Transition ESL. For more information about Transition ESL, see About WDCE .

Additional ESL Sequence Information

For detailed course descriptions, see Course Descriptions .

Language Studies Lab

All ESL students are required to complete 15 clock hours of lab activities. These will be explained in more detail on the course syllabi.

Possible Grades and When Students Need to Repeat a Course

Content mastery is important for student success. Students earning less than 70 percent must repeat the course.

Review or Accelerated Courses Alternatives

There are no review courses for the English as a Second Language sequence.

Department Contact Information

For more information on the ESL sequence, contact the department chair or academic dean.

  Esther Robbins, Department Chair
Language Studies
Bladen Hall, Room 308G
301-546-0942
Vacant, Dean
Liberal Arts
Marlboro Hall, Room 3077
301-546-3040